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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 1, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and maryam moshiri. not—so—open skies... france and the netherlands face off over the future of air france—klm. live from london, that's our top story on the 1st of march. good morning. welcome to breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. our headlines today: social media firms are told to do more to tackle child grooming after 5,000 online offences a tense meeting in paris were recorded in 18 months. between the french and dutch finance ministers after the dutch government there is a danger of a large measles epidemic secretly purchased a big chunk as vaccination rates decline. public health england claims there were around 1,000 cases in england last year. of airline air france—klm. also in the programme... financial re—charge: tesla pulls the plug on most of its stores around the world and says it will only sell cars pakistan is set to release online, to help pay the captured indian pilot as a peace for a cheaper model 3. gesture later this morning, after shooting down his plane in kashmir. keep getting the internet speed you need. new broadband regulations come in today to protect users‘ rights,
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but are they tough enough? a last roll of the dice by fulham. they sack their manager, claudio ranieri, after only 106 days in charge, with relegation from the premier league looking increasingly likely. more than 5,000 online grooming offences were recorded by police in england and wales, according to new data obtained by nspcc. the figures suggested instagram, facebook and snapchat had been used in 70% of cases of sexual communication with a child since it became an offence in april 2017. the charity accused social media firms of ten years of failed self—regulation. ben ando reports. the nspcc describes it as the wild west web, and it is children who are falling prey to online outlaws and being groomed. most are in their
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teens, but many are younger, won just five years old. of the big social media apps, it is instagram that has seen the biggest increase in abuses targeting children, but snapchat and facebook are also widely used, and between them, these three platforms account for 70% of reported cases of sexual communications being made with children. the figures were obtained by the nspcc and freedom of information requests to police forces in england and wales. the charity found that, between april and september 2017, paedophiles attempting to groom or coerced children into sex used instagram on 126 occasions. but in the same period last year that figure had gone up three hold —— fourfold to 328 and while girls aged 12 to 15 are the most common targets, one in five victims was aged 11 or under. ina five victims was aged 11 or under. in a statement, facebook said...
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but the nspcc says this is the result of ten years of failed self—regulation. it wants the rules tightened. the government says it is listening, and a forthcoming white paper will clearly set out what responsibilities of social media companies have, and the consequences of shirking them. a damning report has found that problems with the part—privatisation of the probation service in england and wales have cost taxpayers almost £500 million. under the changes, 21 companies were awarded contracts to supervise low— and medium—risk offenders. the national audit office says the government's approach to the reforms meant they were destined to fail. here is our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. they were his flagship reforms when he was justice secretary. they were his flagship reforms when he wasjustice secretary. in 2015, chris grayling split probation
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between private companies and the national service. he called the process transforming rehabilitation. the aim was to cut reoffending and reduce the cost of crime to society. but the compa ny‘s reduce the cost of crime to society. but the company's contracts are being terminated months early and independent experts now say the system was independent experts now say the syste m was never independent experts now say the system was never going to work. report concludes that the ministry ofjustice set itself up to fail howard approached these probation reforms, and that the consequences of that is services have suffered as a result, and the decision to end the contract early will come at additional cost to the taxpayer. the review of transforming rehabilitation raises serious questions about ministry ofjustice decision—making. it says the payment by results model it used was not well suited to probation. reoffending targets were missed, and taxpayers will have to pay at least £467 million more than under the original terms of the probation contracts. as part of the reforms,
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privation supervision was extended to prisoners who had served short sentences. as a result, the national audit office says the number sent back to jailfor audit office says the number sent back to jail for breaching their release conditions has skyrocketed. the ministry ofjustice accepted the performance of the private probation companies was too often deeply disappointing, but the department said it was spending less than initially forecast. pakistan is due to release an indian fighter pilot who was captured on wednesday after his plane was shot down in kashmir. the country's prime minister has described the move as a gesture of peace after two weeks of building tension in the region. india has welcomed the decision, but says its armed forces remain vigilant. north korea has rejected donald trump's explanation for why their second round of talks unexpectedly collapsed. mr trump said the summit broke down yesterday because mr kim had demanded the complete lifting of sanctions imposed on his country.
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the north korean foreign ministry insisted they had only been seeking partial sanction relief. 0ur south—east asia correspondent jonathan head joins us now from hanoi. jonathan, i mean, this time yesterday it was all unravelling, wasn't it? the early press conference, the cancellation of the lunch, and then there was this positive tone, but it was inevitable that the drip— drip was going to come out now. a very nice lunch, as well, by all accounts. we are not quite sure who ate it, they abandoned it literally just before they were supposed to go into it. i don't think the two sides are quite as farapart as don't think the two sides are quite as far apart as they sound and the tone from the us side and north korean side is regretful but not illiterate or defensive. american officials have clarified that, yes, the north koreans did ask for partial sanctions, but these are pretty much all the crucial economic sanctions. it would have been a very
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big concession, and you need backing from china and russia so if the americans advocated lifting them and supported that, they would be very ha rd to supported that, they would be very hard to reimpose if things went wrong. in return, north korea were saying that it would freeze its missile and nuclear testing, and that it would shut a very important nuclear facility. the americans that it would shut a very important nuclearfacility. the americans have clarified that it is quite a complex place, it has lots of different facilities, and that they couldn't get the north koreans to spell out exactly what that meant. it would yongbyon be completely destroyed, would all the facilities be included? they would all the facilities be included ? they knew would all the facilities be included? they knew the gap was there, they hoped the chemistry between the two men would bridge the gap, that perhaps kimjong—un between the two men would bridge the gap, that perhaps kim jong—un would have something in his pocket. as they said, we couldn't get a deal because in the end there was not ideal they are to be got. thank you very much, jonathan head in hanoi. watching tv for more than 3.5 hours a day could cause older people to lose their memory of words more quickly. researchers at university college london studied 3,500 adults
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who are over 50 and found that the ability to recall words was twice as bad in those who watched more television. so we chat to 3500 elder adults over six years and found that those who are watching television for under 3.5 hours per day had a defect of —— decline of less. and the more they we re decline of less. and the more they were watching the worse their decline was. almost a decade after his death, two men have accused pop star michaeljackson of sexually abusing them hundreds of times in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. wade robson and james safechuck say that, from the age of seven and ten, they were abused by the late singer at his neverland ranch in california. michaeljackson‘s family deny the claims. 0ur correspondent dan johnson reports from los angeles.
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i was seven i was seven years i was seven years old. michael asked, "do you and the family want to come to neverland?" 0nce once again, the king of pop faces allegations he groomed and molested young boys. michael sexually abused me from the age of seven years old until 14 years old. hello, wade. today is your birthday. when the star appeared in court 14 yea rs when the star appeared in court 14 years ago, wade testified that he had never been harmed. i love you, goodbye. this otherworldly figure, this god to me, who had now become my best friend — no way was i ever going to do anything that would pull me away from him. mrjackson? james safechuck was in a commercial with jackson. he says he was abused from the age of ten. you know, he grooms the children, and he grooms the parents as well. so, you know, it's a meticulous sort of build—up. michaeljackson‘s music is still loved, and generates millions of pounds every year.
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he himself always maintained that he had never hurt any child, and some of his family members have continued to defend his reputation. this documentary is not telling the truth. there has not been — not one piece of evidence that corroborates their story. almost a decade after his death, michaeljackson‘s character remains under the spotlight. his true legacy is still being questioned. danjohnson, bbc news, los angeles. a painting found in an attic in france could be a long—lost caravaggio worth in excess of £100 million. the work, which depicts a biblical scene, was even left behind by burglars when they raided the home a number of years ago. the painting will be auctioned without reserve later in the year.
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if you want something quite brutal like that in your living room. if you want something quite brutal like that in your living roomm if you want something quite brutal like that in your living room. it is in pretty good nick for something that has been in the attic all those yea rs. that has been in the attic all those years. but would you want that on your wall? i would if i had years. but would you want that on your wall? i would ifi had paid £100 million for it, yes. i would put lights all over it, keep the curtains opened... there is a reason you don't have multi—million pound at in your room. lasers! it used to be full of colour and richness, and johnjust be full of colour and richness, and john just blanched it out. taking be full of colour and richness, and johnjust blanched it out. taking my poster down and put my caravaggio up. good morning. he is not happy. well, remember what claudio ranieri did at leicester? an amazing season counts for little when you go to your next job. somejobs fit
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for little when you go to your next job. some jobs fit for managers, for little when you go to your next job. somejobs fit for managers, and somejust don't. he job. somejobs fit for managers, and some just don't. he couldn't make it much better, really. he was the man who was supposed to save fulham from relegation, but won only three of his 17 games in charge, and fulham are next—to—bottom of the premier league, with the worst goal difference in the league. ranieri is their second manager of the season, having only taken over in november. scott parker takes temporary charge. cardiff city have been accused of abandoning emiliano sala before the footballer died in a plane crash. willie mckay, who is a former football agent and booked sala's flight, says cardiff left sala to arrange his own travel, an accusation the club strongly reject. great britain's women took silver in the team pursuit at the track cycling world championships in poland, as australia held on for gold in a thrilling finish. the men also took silver. and the wild child of men's tennis, nick kyrgios, has made a new enemy. rafa nadal says kyrgios lacks respect for the public, his rivals, and himself, after being beaten by the australian at the mexican open this week,
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in a match that kyrgios also served underarm. but is underarm underhanded?“ but is underarm underhanded? is it? well, we will talk about it in the papers. underrated, iwould reckon. stay there, because we were look at the back pages in a moment. thomas has the weather for us this morning. the weather is still relatively mild out there. i know we have lost the blue skies by day and that really warm weather that we had, but the temperatures are still above average for the time of year. and actually, on friday, there will be some sunshine around. not everybody will get it but they will be some areas that will have some decent weather. through the early hours of the morning, a lot of cloud, mist murkiness across the uk. a very mild start to friday, nine degrees in london first thing. around four or five a little bit
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further north. tomorrow, where we are going to get that sunshine, i think western areas. cornwall, devon, parts of wales and maybe northern ireland before the rain later arrives. i think the further east you are in these central areas, thatis east you are in these central areas, that is where you are likely to be stuck underneath the cloud. but still 13 in london and double figures as far north as glasgow still 13 in london and double figures as far north as glasgow and edinburgh. so not a bad day, and the weekend is looking very wet and windy. we are expecting gale force winds throughout many western areas of the uk. let's take a look at today's front pages. the telegraph leads with the story of sally challen, who killed her husband in a hammer attack after saying she suffered decades of abuse. she won an appeal yesterday to have her murder conviction quashed. she will now face a retrial. the sun has more details from the trial of a man convicted of letting his girlfriend die after supplying her with drugs. her father, holby city star
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john michie is reported to have confronted his daughter's killer during a clash in court. the guardian's main story claims a lack of sanctions "risks making a mockery" of britain's gender pay gap reporting system. 0n the front page of the times is a picture of the musician andre previn who died yesterday aged 89. his picture they with harry morcom.
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the main story suggests hospitals will no longer have to treat a&e patients within four hours. there is a note on big story dominating the business pages. did you use to have a nokia phone you had to use tojudge every you use to have a nokia phone you had to use to judge every six months. now a new phone, catchy name, it is as thick as three iphones but the battery can last 50 days and you can still go on the internet... it is a smartphone. what mode is that? on standby mode. with the smartphone, even if you put it oi'i
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the smartphone, even if you put it on standby, it is pretty... you do not use it though! would you have plumbed one ——on that big? you carry portable chargers as much as anything else. i am sorry about the folding. she likes the corners to be neat. we do not have to reveal all oui’ neat. we do not have to reveal all our secrets! they are horses. with fabulous hairstyles. do not think any of them are having a particularly bad hair day. this one has obviously taken some real care.
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is that they can't? can we go from horses to white rabbit.|j is that they can't? can we go from horses to white rabbit. i completely forgot. before you say it anything else to anybody on the first of march you need to save white rabbit. it isa march you need to save white rabbit. it is a bit odd the first person you see is a taxi driver. lots on play on the fulham story. on the back page, 0le given thejob on the fulham story. on the back
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page, 0le given the job full—time. and is it underhand to serve underarm. you did not get the power and in the match against nadal, the ball didn't land in the box. was he just trying to annoy him? it is a clever tactic against the dull because he stands so far back. —— nadal. michael chang did it in 1989. as for amateur players, when the arms get tired, it works. first of march means less than a month to go until we leave the european union.
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still rather a lot of questions to be answered, we are going to be talking to a brexit panel together. we have invited them to a planning meeting and one audience is coming later. travel is one issue that keeps coming up. tim muffet and jayne mccubbin spent the day with two of the panellists to see what they want from oui’ coverage. my my name is tony and i voted to remain in the eu. i believe that bbc coverage should have been more positive in terms of showing the opportunities of remaining. positive in terms of showing the opportunities of remaininglj positive in terms of showing the opportunities of remaining. i voted to leave the eu. i feel the bbc cove rage of to leave the eu. i feel the bbc coverage of brexit has been scaremongering and a very negative. it is about time we show the
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positive aspects of leaving the eu and getting behind our businesses. they did not realise that educated people knew what they were voted for. the scaremongering was that we would not be able to trade, not be able to travel. we are a british furniture in any factor. santos company is based in britain. upon reflection, he thinks leaving is a good thing. most people think it is a negative and that europe is the only place in the world to buy everything. it is opportunity to see that people in the uk can produce what we want and can produce it well. the views from people is clear, the coverage of brexit has been too negative. too much of what
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many call project fear and more about the benefits of leaving the eu. not everyone agrees. tony thinks way more attention should be given to the positive impact that investment from the eu has had on this country and what happens when it is gone? there is not enough information in terms of why it we are leaving, the benefits of that so in the absence of that information, we should he staying. we have come to the new extension of the metro link in manchester. it has been assisted with eu cash as well as access to preferential eu loans. we have seen growth with the eu investing in our cities. we have beenin investing in our cities. we have been in receipt of a lot of money over a long period of time and now we are leaving? yes. for tony, money
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has been invested in areas neglect did. it is true the eu spend money in great britain but at the end of the day, we do not have to give so much and spend that money on ourselves and keep britain great. much and spend that money on ourselves and keep britain greatlj do not believe westminster will pull the gap. there are clear benefits for being a member. if we leave, i believe we will lose. those are the opinions that count. brexit — your stories will continue throughout the day on the bbc news channel, bbc radio five live and online. the special edition of your call is on bbc radio five live and the news channel from nine until ten. tell us what you want to know. maybe
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that thing that has been niggling at you. you might finally get an answer today. when you were a teenager, did you think you had anything about you that would make you a millionaire? no. i guess you could have a good idea or run the shop. this teenager in argentina is now the millionaire because he is taken advantage of his skill of finding tiny glitches in software. he has made it work. he is only 19, he began hacking the fun. no formal training but those skills have made him in demand. we have been to meet him. i am a hacker. he
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is 19, he has made a million and he is 19, he has made a million and he is doing a job few people even know exist that he is a bug bounty hunter. in other words, exist that he is a bug bounty hunter. in otherwords, he exist that he is a bug bounty hunter. in other words, he protects your privacy on line. got this a year ago. did you find your bank account was filling up and didn't know how you could spend it? yes. he leaves a millionaire lifestyle in argentina. he is the top bounty hunter. we are in the centre of the complex. it is a private village where you have your security. it is more expensive than normal places but it is worth it. i do not like being the typical... like being a
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normal guy. have you been tempted to use the skills for bad? at the beginning yes. what was it that stopped it? the bounty saved me in that way. to you get excited by money? yes, of course. i like money. i like hacking. great combination. as malicious hackers grow in number and sophistication, companies are increasingly turning to new way to test the security. when a hacker finds a floor, there submit a report and get paid. you are now looking at the code of this website. do you think you're making the internet better? yes, of course. each week you make the internet safer. a good feeling? yes. what companies have
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you helped? feeling? yes. what companies have you helped ? horizon, feeling? yes. what companies have you helped? horizon, us government. he earns 40 times more than the average argentinian and is co mforta bly average argentinian and is comfortably one of the richest teenagers in the country but he tries to live a normal teenage life. my tries to live a normal teenage life. my aim is to own my company, a big company that everyone knows. the work keeps coming as the threat from bad hackers grows every day. you need to win the bad hacker, find their move first. do you think you are winning the race or are there too many bad hackers? we are 50-50 in the race but i hope i will win
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the race. underachiever. i was prepared to haiti but he is actually quite a nice bloke. nice and clever. he can afford to be nice. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. transport for london says its losing £100 million a year to fare dodgers, far more than previously thought. it says new technology, including the ability to where track 0yster cards are used, has given a clearer picture of how big the problem is. tfl says it's also helping catch more fare evaders, with prosecutions up 15% last year. we think it is now even more imperative that we go after those people who avoid paying a fair and
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therefore rob people of the investment in our transport system. we need to take action against them. a teenager who died after he was stabbed in a hairdressers in north london, has been named by police as kamali gabbidon—lynck. the 19—year—old was chased by a gang riding bikes in wood green, last friday, and attacked infront of children. a second man, a 20 year old, was also injured. tonight, detectives are returning to the area to appeal for information. the heads of the met police and london fire brigade willjoin the mayor this morning, to review how well the capital's prepared in the event of a no—deal brexit. commissioners cressida dick and dany cotton are among senior officials heading to city hall to discuss the impact it could have on londoners— and how best to communicate the short—term risks. let's take a look at the travel now. we'll start with the tube, where it's all looking good actually, no reported problems on any of those lines there.
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we do have problems on great northern services because of a failure. a lane closed for works in king's cross. and a burst water main in caledonian road. time for the weather now. good morning, today marks the first day of the mitra logical spring but it will be a lot cooler than it did at the beginning of the week. always plenty of cloud around. a few spots of drizzle but either then that it should stay mostly dry. a misty but dry start to the morning. temperatures between seven and nine degrees celsius. we could see a little bit of brightening as we head towards the afternoon. mostly dry but would not
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rule out a few spots of drizzle at times. 13 the top temperature. staying mild for this time of year and just like south—westerly wind. 0vernight tonight, we will see some cloud band developing. 0utbreaks 0vernight tonight, we will see some cloud band developing. outbreaks of rain pushing in from the west as we head into saturday morning. a wet start to the day and it will be wet and windy at times over the weekend particularly on sunday. some stormont gusts of wind. well i will be back in around half an hour. there's more news, travel and weather of course on our website at the usual address bbc.co.uk/london or tune into bbc radio london. now though, i'll hand you back tojon and naga. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. it is 6:30am. also on breakfast this morning: brexit takeover. three bbc viewers get the chance to have their questions answered.
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and if you are over 50 and watching more than 3.5 hours of tv a day, find out why it could accelerate your memory loss. just after 8:30am this morning, we will be catching up with dan on the last day of his comic relief challenge to climb mt kilimanjaro. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: more than 5,000 online grooming offences were recorded by police in england and wales in the last 18 months, according to new data obtained by nspcc. the figures suggested instagram, facebook and snapchat had been used in 70% of cases of sexual communication with a child since it became an offence in april 2017. the charity accused social media firms of ten years of failed self—regulation.
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a damning report has found that problems with the part—privatisation of the probation service in england and wales have cost taxpayers almost £500 million. under the changes, 21 companies were awarded contracts to supervise low— and medium—risk offenders. the national audit office says the government's approach to the reforms meant they were destined to fail. pakistan is due to release an indian fighter pilot who was captured on wednesday after his plane was shot down in kashmir. the country's prime minister has described the move as a gesture of peace, after two weeks of building tension in the region. india has welcomed the decision, but says its armed forces remain vigilant. private—hire taxi drivers in london are launching a legal challenge against the city's mayor, sadiq khan. it is over plans to force them to pay a congestion charge, which comes into effect in april and will mean they have to pay £11.50 a day. the measure is part of the mayor's plans to reduce congestion
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and tackle air pollution. watching tv for more than 3.5 hours a day could cause older people to lose their language skills more quickly. researchers at university college london studied 3,500 adults who are over 50 and found that the ability to remember words was twice as bad in those who watched more television. so we chat to 3,500 elder adults over six years, and we found that those who are watching television whereas those who watched for more than 3.5 hours a day had 10%. and the more they were watching, the worse their decline was. so many questions about that, what about those who are not in a position to be talking to other
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people? around 115,000 pupils across england won't get their first choice of secondary school, due to a continuing shortage of places, according to analysis by the good schools guide. teaching unions have warned that increasing numbers could face disappointment because of what they describe as the intense pressure for places. the schools minister, nick gibb, says an extra 825,000 places have been created since 2010 to keep up with demand. good luck to you if you are opening mail to find out where you are going to school next year. that is a big deal. i was moving from hertfordshire to yorkshire, so it was a new place, new friends, everything was new. we had the thing of... were all your friends from primary school going to that secondary school? we had that as well. these things today suggest
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that lots of groups of primary school mates will be split up. you tend to find that people who go to secondary school with their primary school mates, it ends up making a difference. and four old claudio ranieri, reputations count for nothing and there was this romantic vision that the man who won the premier league with leicester could come out and save for them, but in the words of phil mcnulty it turned into a loveless arranged marriage. we know how fickle football can be. so claudio ranieri is out, sacked by fulham, with the club second—bottom of the premier league, having conceeded the most goals of any team this season. first team coach scott parker is now in temporary charge. so where has it gone wrong for ranieri, who of course won the premier league with leicester in 2016? well, he was only in charge for 106 days, taking over from slavisa jokanovic in november.
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it makes him the eighth—shortest permanent manager in premier league history. in that time, he was only able to win three times, losing a total of 11 games in 17 matches. fulham are ten points from safety, with only ten games remaining. you can call it, if you like, full‘s last roll of the dice. cardiff city have been accused of abandoning emiliano sala before the footballer died in a plane crash. sala died along with pilot david ibbotson when their plane came down in the english channel in january. former football agent willie mckay booked the flight for sala. he says cardiff left sala to arrange his own travel, an accusation the club, strongly reject. he wasn't abandoned, more or less, to do hisjob. nobody in cardiff seemed to be doing anything, and it was a bit embarrassing, the cardiff situation. it is if i had a player
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worth 17 million euros and then leave him in a hotel, himself, trying to go on the computer and look for a flight. great britain's women won silver in the team pursuit at the track cycling world championships in poland. the team of laura kenny, elinor barker, katie archibald and eleanor dickinson were just beaten by australia in the final, missing out by 0.2 seconds. and it was the four—time 0lympic champion kenny who took the blame for not getting gold. back home, we ran a quick time, and i had as back home, we ran a quick time, and ihad asa back home, we ran a quick time, and i had as a legs, much better legs. and ijust didn't have it here these last two days. i don't know why, it's not like i've been feeling u nwell it's not like i've been feeling unwell or anything. and so, yes, it's not like i've been feeling unwell oranything. and so, yes, i feel partly responsible for it, to be totally honest. because like i say, back home we went quicker, we ran quicker. so it's a bit disappointing, i guess. there was silver too for the mens's team, who also lost out to an australian
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team, that broke the world record on their way to gold in the team pursuit. st helens have gone top of super league thanks to a comfortable win over the salford red devils last night. captainjames roby scored two tries, including this one late in the second half. saints have started the season brilliantly, with four wins from four matches so far. the wild child of men's tennis, nick kyrgios, has made a new enemy. rafa nadal says kyrgios lacks respect for the public, his rivals, and himself, after being beaten by the australian at the mexican open this week, in a match that kyrgios also served underarm. we were asking if that is underhand, is that against the rules? it is not the most effective shot because you don't get the power of the overrun served but in this case, as some have suggested, it was to try and outthink rafael nadal, you know, mentally shake him up by serving this short serve underarm. kind of
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counterintuitive. and people have pointed out that nadal tends to stand a long wait behind the baseline, so maybe it was quite smart to try and outfox him like that. it didn't work and players don't tend to do it because you don't tend to do it because you don't get the power, but there was another example in 1989, and players who play for fun, another example in 1989, and players who play forfun, play another example in 1989, and players who play for fun, play with the kids, we often serve underarm. or play the whole game underarm. kids, we often serve underarm. or play the whole game underarmm kids, we often serve underarm. or play the whole game underarm. it is a bit ofa play the whole game underarm. it is a bit of a talking point, and nick kyrgios has a bit of a talking point, and nick kyrg ios has ruffled a bit of a talking point, and nick kyrgios has ruffled a few feathers. people talk about him, one of those players that really gets players engaged. we were talking about at being a very big day. the good schools guide says there is intense pressure on secondary school places in some areas of the country for schools rated by 0fsted as outstanding and good. as many as 115,000 pupils are expected to miss out on theirfirst choice of secondary school,
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as families across england find out this morning which ones their children will attend in september. so what do you do in that situation, why is it happening, could anything be done to try and improve things? let's speak to bernadettejohn, director of the good schools guide, who joins us from westminster. thanks, bernadette. what are we expecting to happen this morning, what sort of numbers are we talking about? yes, we are predicting around 115,000 disappointed about? yes, we are predicting around 115, 000 disappointed household about? yes, we are predicting around 115,000 disappointed household this morning. and that is a lot of children who are suddenly in a situation where they might not be going to school with their mates, or not the route they were expecting. what sort of impact can that have on a child and a family? well, of course, you know, it is your child, pa rents course, you know, it is your child, pa re nts get course, you know, it is your child, parents get incredibly upset if they don't get the school they want and it can be a very worrying time for the child. 0ne it can be a very worrying time for the child. one of the first things we say to families is, when you get
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that notification, if it is a school you are fearful about, do not convey that to your child, because of the scenario they might end up going there and the worst possible thing is to have it ringing in their ears, that it is to have it ringing in their ears, thatitis is to have it ringing in their ears, that it is a terrible school full of thugs and bullies. so try and stay positive. the government say they have created nearly an extra million school places over the last ten yea rs. school places over the last ten years. how can it be that we are in this situation that so many children can't get into the school they want to? why is it happening? a few reasons for that. for one thing, the creation of new places is in no way keeping up with a population boom. we knew ten or 11 years ago that these children were being born. the other thing is the move to free schools. the government is very keen on free school is setting up and it has taken away from local authorities the power to set up their own schools where they see fit. the thing about free schools if they don't respond to a particular need, so people can set up wherever
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they like, catering to a particular ethos or a particular religious creed, not necessarily in the places where there is the greatest demand for places. and the third aspect is that we have created this illusion of pa rental that we have created this illusion of parental choice, and parents are given booklets and told to select schools in their order of preference. well, actually, that really doesn't exist, because of the admissions criteria. you can end up with very few schools that you are actually eligible for, and nobody wa nts to actually eligible for, and nobody wants to send their child to a school which requires improvement or is inadequate according to 0fsted, so is inadequate according to 0fsted, so you is inadequate according to 0fsted, so you are is inadequate according to 0fsted, so you are concentrating all the people trying to place their children into the best schools. people trying to place their children into the best schoolslj suppose the government would say those free schools they are creating a part of that choice, they have extended the choice to parents. are there particular parts of the country where this is more of a problem than other places? definitely, the pinch points are the big cities, london, birmingham,
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manchester, bristol. just because of the density of population and also the density of population and also the fact schools in those areas can't very easily expand. if you have a countryside school surrounded by fields, there is much more scope to add new buildings. the best place in the country to be is northumberland where around 98% of people get the school they want. but parts of london, hammersmith and fulham, just over half of people get school they want. and in london, they have the name six preferences, and around 8% of people will get none of those six choices. and so have to get another school, maybe some commute away. i suppose the challenge for local authorities, for the government, for schools, is kind of predicting those kinds of population trends you are talking about. we might have a boom at the moment which needs more places but in another ten years' time it might have dipped again and there might be a load of surplus schools and classrooms. it is very hard to plan
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and predicts, isn't it? well, not really, we have the birth records, we know how many children were born in this year, ten or 11 years ago, who will be requiring a secondary school place now, so it is a failure of planning. thank you very much indeed. good luck to you if you are finding out this morning, get in touch if you are affected by that and it changes your plans, you are trying to work out how to manage it at home, of course, there is an appeals process as well, but that can takea appeals process as well, but that can take a long time. it is nerve racking enoughjust can take a long time. it is nerve racking enough just starting school, let alone figuring that out. it's the first day of spring and matt is out amongst the flowers at the oxford arboretum this morning. it is also saint davids day. we are bringing you some daffodils. good morning. well said. happy saint
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davids day. we arejust morning. well said. happy saint davids day. we are just outside 0xford, at the oxford arboretum. it stretches back 400 years since it was established. whilejohn says it feels more like winter, it is small relative and it comes back to what we should be. we have had a phenomenal spell of weather. nine countries in europe have broken temperature records. but our weather has now been reset but it does mean it will not be too bad a day. let's ta ke it will not be too bad a day. let's take a look at the details. a frost—free start to your friday. some brightness breakthrough now and then. we have a little bit of blue sky overhead in oxford. a strip of
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white cloud drifting to the west of ireland getting closer and closer and it will bring wet weather later in the day. the cloud it enough or a few spots stop eastern scotland in particular. some sunshine south—east scotland, north—east england, and a few glimmers of brightness here and there. a bit of sunshine come and go through the date of overall fairly dry. by the end of the afternoon, rain to the west of northern ireland. temperatures not far—off yesterday's values. it is not feel too bad for the first day of march. as we go into the evening, prepare for wet weather. the rain will spread into scotland, wales and much of england as we go through the night. it all helps to keep the temperature is up. with a bit strong
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tonight into tomorrow morning. —— winds. starting a little bit on the damp site. saturday the not too bad to begin with. sunny spells in many areas. before we get more bad weather from the west. east anglia, saint dry until the end of the afternoon. temperatures in double figures for the most part. some strong winds in the northern half of the country going into sunday. a mixture of sunshine and showers. the big uncertainty it is how much rain will develop across england and wales. it looks wetter than yesterday. low pressure bringing rain to england and wales, it is still developing. it could be further north or south. wales, the midlands and southern parts of england could be particularly wet and it turned much colder sunday
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into sunday night. it looks marvellous. it is the first of month and later this month we are expected to leave the european union. what does it mean and how should the media report it? we're giving you the chance to speak about a... steady on! it is a brexit ta keover a... steady on! it is a brexit takeover and an opportunity to give us takeover and an opportunity to give usa takeover and an opportunity to give us a break. let's see what happened when they sat in on an editorial meeting here at breakfast. people have voted and they want brexit. i married with two children.
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this city is built on the back of immigration. i interested on the impact of brexit. i am a mum, a baker. the reason so much information, it is easier to switch off and not look at it any more. i wa nt off and not look at it any more. i want to look for summer but how can idoit want to look for summer but how can ido it if want to look for summer but how can i do it if we do not know what is happening with brexit. the government is making it complicated and confusing. everything associated with brexit is dour and depressing. wet is the money going and how is it being used? wet is the money going and how is it being used ? the wet is the money going and how is it being used? the eu has put money into this part of the world. what would you preach to us? concentrate on the money we give to the eu. what we could do instead to make this country great. you did not know how much it is going to be effective
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until you go deeper into it. out of this will make some telly.|j until you go deeper into it. out of this will make some telly. i have never seen some of this will make some telly. i have never seen some of those people listen to anybody before. they never listen to us! one of the audience members you saw in that film, sanam, wanted some facts in our reporting about travel in the eu after brexit. nina's with her now and we're going to try and get some of the answers she wants. we're all told on a daily basisjust how big a deal brexit is and how important it could be for all sorts of areas of our lives. but it can be really confusing — even for people like us who are talking about it every day. sanam is with us now and am sure she's not alone in wondering how it will impact one of the most important things we spend our money on — travel. so! she has her questions and we have transport expert simon calder who joins us live from breakfast airways airport.
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sanam, over to you. will i and my family need visas to visit other european countries? not immediately. let me prefix this that if you are going to the republic of ireland nothing changes. we are covered to the common travel area and that trumps eu rules. in terms of your passport, it sees european union at the top and it will continue to be that, it has a british document after brexit. what happens next depends on whether there is a deal or not. if the reason a deal, there will be no need of change until 2021. with no deal, you need to be very careful about your passport validity and go on
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line to your government passport checking service. it has just been launched. you will be able to find out if your passport is going to be eligible for entry. it is notjust a matter of having six months left but also the date of issue matters as well. we know that from 2021, the country national ‘s will need to have the european travel information and authorisation system. that will cost you 7 euros and the valid for three years. if you are over 70 you do not have to pay. this takes us to 2021. does that answer your question? yes, it does. wanted to know about my travel insurance. will it go up now we are going to leave the eu? at the moment and i will
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mention european health insurance guides. it provides health insurance. and you need it if you go into europe and get treatment into a local hospital. this will continue to be valid as normal. if you travel before the end of march, keep it up—to—date. after that, if britain leaves with a deal. if there is no deal, the card will not be valid but the association of british insurance tell me it will continue to be paid out even if you have the card. longer term, of course, you will find prices will increase because we lose that ehic insurance. it may
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cover disruption, your insurance, if you have extra expenses such as unused accommodation you might be covered but it depends on what your travel insurance policy says. always important to look at your small ring. it will be flights and accommodation be changed? will get more expensive? it depends on a lot of factors, including the value of the pound. however, a low pound generally means higher costs, from the cost of fuel, two meals, accommodation, car rental and so on. if the pound is weak it means higher costs against the euro. there will be generally not change in travel
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dot longer term it may be that fair increases and choice decreases but it all depends on whether particularly if the open sky agreement continue in force. simon will be back with us later. and you lot — our audiences — are in the driving seat across bbc news for the rest of the day — on bbc news channel, bbc radio five live and online. so keep those questions coming. we are quite relaxed here. there are people getting in touch thanking you because they have been wondering about the same thing. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm sonja jessup. transport for london says its losing one hundred million pounds a year to fare dodgers far more than previously thought. it says new technology, including the ability to track where 0yster cards are used has given a clearer picture of how big the problem is. tfl says it's also helping catch more fare evaders with prosecutions up 15 per cent last year. we think it is now even more imperative that we go after those people who deliberately avoid paying a fair and therefore rob people london of the investment in our transport system. we need to take action against them. a teenager who died after he was stabbed in a hairdressers in north london— has been named by police as the 19—year—old was chased by a gang riding bikes in wood green last friday and attacked infront of children.
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a second man, a 20 year old, was also injured. detectives are returning to the area tonight to appeal for information. the heads of the met police and london fire brigade willjoin the mayor this morning to review how well the capital's prepared in the event of a no—deal brexit. commissioners cressida dick and dany cotton are among senior officials heading to city hall to discuss the impact it could have on londoners— and how best to communicate the short—term risks. let's take a look at the travel now. we have minor delays on the 0verground— between watford junction and euston— not enough trains available apparently. however we do have problems on great northern trains— there's disruption between stevenage and hertford north due to a points failure. in king's cross lane is closed and worst water lane.
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time for the weather now with elizabeth rizzini good morning. today marks the first day of the meteorological spring but it will feel a lot cooler than it did at the beginning of the week. always plenty of cloud around. a few spots of drizzle but other then that it should stay mostly dry. a misty but dry start to the morning. temperatures between seven and nine degrees celsius. we could see a little bit of brightening as we head towards the afternoon. mostly dry but would not rule out a few spots of drizzle at times. 12—13 the top temperature. staying mild for this time of year and just a light south—westerly wind. 0vernight tonight, we will see some cloud band developing. outbreaks of rain pushing in from the west as we head into saturday morning. a wet start to the day and it will be wet and windy at times over
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the weekend particularly on sunday. some heavy rain and storm gusts of wind. well i will be back in around half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: social media firms are told to do more to tackle child grooming after 5,000 online offences were recorded in 18 months. there is a danger of a large measles epidemic as vaccination rates decline. public health england claims there were around 1,000 cases in england last year. pakistan is set to release the captured indian pilot as a peace gesture later this morning, after shooting down his plane in kashmir. it is brexit audience takeover day across the bbc,
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and on breakfast, we are answering your travel questions. visas, flights, fees — what will happen? i'm going to find out what you need to know about after we leave the eu. a last roll of the dice by fulham. they sack their manager, claudio rainieri, after only 106 days in charge, with relegation from the premier league looking increasingly likely. and you may have already felt like we are fair, but today is the first day of spring, meteorologically speaking, anyway. cloud around, most will be dry but this weekend there will be dry but this weekend there will be dry but this weekend there will be some wet and windy weather coming our way. i will have all the details here on breakfast. more than 5,000 online grooming offences were recorded by police in england and wales in the last 18 months. according to new data obtained by the nspcc, instagram, facebook and snapchat were used in 70% of cases of sexual communication with a child. the charity accused social media firms of 10 years of failed self—regulation.
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ben ando reports. the nspcc describes it as the wild west web, and it is children who are falling prey to online outlaws and being groomed. most are in their teens, but many are younger, one just five years old. of the big social media apps, it is instagram that has seen the biggest increase in abusers targeting children. but snapchat and facebook are also widely used, and between them, these three platforms account for 70% of reported cases of sexual communications being made with children. the figures were obtained by the nspcc and freedom of information requests to police forces in england and wales. the charity found that, between april and september 2017, paedophiles attempting to groom or coerce children into sex used instagram on 126 occasions.
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but in the same period last year, that figure had gone up threefold, to 428, and while girls aged 12—15 are the most common targets, one in five victims was aged 11 or under. in a statement, facebook said... but the nspcc says this is the result of ten years of failed self—regulation. it wants the rules tightened. the government says it is listening, and a forthcoming white paper will clearly set out what responsibilities social media companies have, and the consequences of shirking them. and in a few minutes, we will be speaking to andy burrows from the nspcc. a damning report has found that problems with the part—privatisation
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of the probation service in england and wales have cost taxpayers almost £500 million. under the changes, 21 companies were awarded contracts to supervise low— and medium—risk offenders. the national audit office says the government's approach to the reforms meant they were destined to fail. almost a decade after his death, two men have accused pop star michaeljackson of sexually abusing them hundreds of times in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. wade robson and james safechuck say that, from the age of seven and ten, they were abused by the late singer at his neverland ranch in california. michaeljackson's family denies the claims. 0ur correspondent dan johnson reports from los angeles. i was seven years old. michael asked, "do you and the family want to come to neverland?" once again, the king of pop faces allegations he groomed and molested young boys. michael sexually abused me from the age of seven years old until 14 years old.
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hello, wade. today is your birthday. when the star appeared in court 14 years ago, wade testified that he had never been harmed. i love you, goodbye. this otherworldly figure, this god to me, who had now become my best friend — no way was i ever going to do anything that would pull me away from him. mrjackson? james safechuck was in a commercial with jackson. he says he was abused from the age of ten. you know, he grooms the children, and he grooms the parents, as well. so, you know, it's a meticulous sort of build—up. michaeljackson's music is still loved, and generates millions of pounds every year. he himself always maintained that he had never hurt any child, and some of his family members have continued to defend his reputation. this documentary is not telling the truth. there has not been —
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not one piece of evidence that corroborates their story. almost a decade after his death, michaeljackson's character remains under the spotlight. his true legacy is still being questioned. danjohnson, bbc news, los angeles. there will be more on this story on the victoria derbyshire programme from 10:00am on the bbc news channel. an indian fighter pilot captured by pakistan on wednesday after it shot down his plane in kashmir is set to be released today. the country's prime minister has described the move as a gesture of peace. india has welcomed the decision, but says its armed forces remain vigilant. 0ur correspondent sangita myska is in delhi this morning. we have had weeks of tension. is this going to try and ease that tension, do you think, or does the tension, do you think, or does the tension continue? well, it is certainly hoped that if this handover goes ahead, those tensions that have been steadily rising over
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the last two weeks will to some extent de—escalate. the exact details of how this handover is going to happen are still a little bit vague. what we understand is that the pakistani side are saying that the pakistani side are saying that it will happen sometime this afternoon, and that is likely to happen along the india— pakistan border, bubbly at a checkpoint. the indians, however, say that they cannot confirm that this is the way in which this pilot will be returned to them. now, pakistan has managed to them. now, pakistan has managed to capture this pilot after the pakistan air force and the indian air force engaged in a dogfight over the skies above the disputed region of kashmir. kashmir lies between pakistan and india and both countries claim its sovereignty. 0ver countries claim its sovereignty. over 70 years they have for the two wa i’s over 70 years they have for the two wars and a major conflict. now, both india and pakistan are nuclear neighbours, and the rising tensions
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this time around have caused great concerns amongst the international community. either way, both concerns amongst the international community. eitherway, both india and pakistan are claiming this handover as a victory. thank you very much indeed, we will speak to you later and maybe get more developments about the release of that pilot. the mayor of london's plan to impose a congestion charge on private—hire drivers is being challenged in the courts. sadiq khan's strategy is designed to tackle pollution, but drivers claim it amounts to discrimination. our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman reports. how do you reduce traffic and improve air quality in our city centres? from 8 april, the mayor of london, sadiq khan, will make private—hire drivers like hardy pay the £11.50 daily congestion charge to drive in central london. black cabs will remain exempt. i'll be almost £60 less every week, and i've been punished to come to work, and i've been forced to pay for it. we're already poor, we're already
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on the poverty line. 94% of london's roughly 114,000 private—hire drivers are from black, asian and minority ethnic backgrounds, and that has led to a legal challenge. the independent workers union of great britain, which represents private—hire drivers like those demonstrating here, is seeking a judicial review of the mayor's decision, on the basis that it is discriminatory and in breach of human rights. in a statement, the mayor's office said... with cities like birmingham and manchester now looking at introducing congestion charges, this legal challenge could influence which groups of drivers can be forced to pay them. clive coleman, bbc news.
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the city of salisbury is expected to be declared fully decontaminated later, almost a year after the nerve agent poisoning of the russian former agent sergei skripal and his daughter. more than 600 military personnel have been involved in the clean—up at 12 sites in the area. many families in england this morning are nervously waiting to find out if their 11—year—olds are going to go to their chosen secondary school. there is a shortage of places at the moment, so around 115,000 pupils will be disappointed. that is according to analysis by the good schools guide. the schools minister, nick gibb, says nearly1 million places are being created over this decade to keep up with demand. emojis are usually reserved for text messages or chatting online, but from today, car owners in australia will be able to add them to their number plates. the plates have been designed by personalised plates queensland,
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and drivers can choose from five emojis, including the the crying laughing face, the heart eyes emoji and the original smiley. i thought you could pick ones you wanted. what would you choose? no, don't. i never thought! wanted. what would you choose? no, don't. i never thought i would ever use an emoji, and now they are part of the lexicon. coming soon to a number plate near you. let's return to our top story. the nspcc is calling for tighter regulation of social media firms
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in response to new figures relating to online child grooming offences. police in england and wales recorded more than 5,000 crimes in the 18 months to september. let's discuss this with the nspcc‘s andy burrows, who is in our london newsroom. good morning to you, thank you very much for talking to us this morning. whereas most of this online grooming happening, in terms of social media? which apps, which platforms? well, what is really concerning is that almost 70% of these offences are taking place on just three sites, on facebook, snapchat, and in particular instagram. i think that is really concerning because we are looking at the largest sites here, the sites which have the biggest resources to be able to get on top of this problem, they are the ones which now have the most significant
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problem in terms of the number of offences and i think for those at the nspcc, that really underlines that we have seen that the social network embley will not do enough by themselves to protect children who are using their sites, and that is really why we are calling for the government to step in and commit to statutory regulation. how likely is that going to be? we are hopeful that going to be? we are hopeful that will happen because what we have seen over the last decade is 13 different exa m ples of have seen over the last decade is 13 different examples of various industry initiatives, of self regulatory codes, and all of those come to nothing. we have seen 5000 grooming offences in the last 18 months, so we are really clear now that the home secretary has a really golden opportunity to introduce this regulation in the next two weeks. the government will set out its thinking ina the government will set out its thinking in a white paper in the next couple of weeks. if the government does this, this could be a real game changer that can stop, u nfortu nately, a real game changer that can stop, unfortunately, the status quo, which is that children are being groomed on the largest social networking
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sites every day. tell me the indication you have been given from the government that this is likely to happen. how likely is this to happen? well, we know that the government has said that they are seriously considering regulation, and in particular... they have said that for a long time, though, haven't they? well, yes, and the model we would like to see is a duty of care imposed, a legal responsibility to identify the risks such as grooming that children face on their sites, and then they should face really tough legal consequences if they fail to design and operate their sites to effectively mitigate those risks. so the government say they are seriously considering this. it is absolutely vital, though, that we do see government action.|j it is absolutely vital, though, that we do see government action. i know it is vital, but i am just trying to get to the point, i share your frustration and i know you are frustrated along with me. when would it happen, and what would it look like? are we talking fines, banning the app, banning the platforms, what would it look like? so this would be a regulatory model in which
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platforms have to take concrete action around harms such as grooming, such as child abuse imagery, and if platforms do not drive down the number of instances of these harms, then they face really tough consequences. for us, thatis really tough consequences. for us, that is really significant fines, but is also about a new corporate criminal offence. we would like to see companies prosecuted and named directors being held responsible if they failed to uphold a duty of care to children. because we really have seen to children. because we really have seen that the platforms will not do this for themselves, so unless you have a regulator and a regulator with teeth, then unfortunately we will just see with teeth, then unfortunately we willjust see more children being put in harm's way. obviously without going into any tricky detail, i think many people will find it fascinating that a five—year—old can be groomed online. i mean, what does that look like a smack well, we know that look like a smack well, we know that more and more younger children are using social networks, and one
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of the big risks is around live streaming, where children can live broadcast themselves to the internet, and that is particularly concerning for us, because we know that rumours are able to use a range of sophisticated emotional techniques to coerce and persuade increasingly younger children to then be subject to abuse on these sites —— groomers. then be subject to abuse on these sites -- groomers. and when you think about live streaming in particular, the inherently live, visual nature of that platform, lots of us as adults may feel uncomfortable saying no to request in the immediacy of a live visual context, but we are talking about very young children on these platforms, who are really at significant risk. and there are guidelines, you are not supposed to be on until you are 13. guidelines, you are not supposed to be on untilyou are 13. yes, so children are supposed to be 13 before they can signup to a social media account. we know that those rules are not widely enforced. half of uk children 12 and under have at least one social network account. so u nfortu nately we a re least one social network account. so unfortunately we are seeing lots of
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children way below that age who are using social network account every day. the have to talk to you about something spoken a lot on social media. this hoax, a character that has been around on line since 2016, produced by a japanese special effects com pa ny. produced by a japanese special effects company. it is a scary looking thing but it has been causing concern from parents and children even because it is being used to frighten children. can you put any fears to rest about this? we know this has been hugely concerning the parents with just the sheer volume. we are not aware that any child in the uk has come to harm as a result of this challenge. but this isa a result of this challenge. but this is a great opportunity to talk to your child about what they are doing
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on line and have regular conversations, tried to take the sting and confusion of what they are doing on line. ask them what site they are using. we have a resource that gives a guide to popular website and games and it is of those regular conversations and being informed about what sites your child is visiting seeking give them practical steps to keep your child safe. thank you for your time this morning. it is the first day of spring and matt is out amongst the flowers at the oxford arboretum this morning. i have been watching him at the corner of my eye and he has been looking up into the trees. what are you looking up for? it is a little bit too dark, there are three peacocks sitting in the tree. we are
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waiting for them to sweep down on us. waiting for them to sweep down on us. i never knew you got peacocks on trees. we will try to get through this. good morning. we are outside 0xford. at the oldest botanical garden and it is the first day of spring, the first of march and what an end to winter it was and it looks like, provisionally speaking, that it could be our warmest february an record, as far as the highest temperatures. but thinks back to where things should be. it is looking cooler. cloud and
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murkiness. we have got rain starting to edge its way closer coming in with the whiteout strip of cloud to the west of ireland. that will bring rain to northern ireland later. for the morning commute i think you can get away without the umbrella. patchy rain in eastern parts of england and eastern scotland but that will gradually depart. mostly dry but as a breeze ticks up late in the day, northern ireland will start to see rain late in the afternoon into the evening. temperatures are just about in double figures for some in scotland, elsewhere 10 degrees. it is still about where it should be. you have to put things into perspective. we are back closer to where we should be. rain this evening in northern ireland spreading to parts of scotland, wales and northern england. some
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heavy bursts but it turned light as it heads to eastern parts of england later on. a frost free night yet again. for the start of the weekend, early patchy rain across eastern parts of england. sunshine through saturday before weight and increasingly windy weather pushes through northern ireland and into scotla nd through northern ireland and into scotland wales and the eastern parts of england. a bit of afternoon sunshine. temperatures up to 14— 15 degrees. cooler by sunday. strong winds taking us into sunday. severe gales in places. much of england and wales cloudy, some heavy and persistent rain especially the further south you. the rain a bit uncertain at the moment. we will keep you updated. cooler as we go into next week.
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if those peacocks come in sight, will you take a picture and send it to us? we will try and capture the moment... i thought you said you're going to capture the peacocks. they are probably as big as i am! you can see it, it isn'tjust in there.|j think it could get messy, mate. imagine capturing the peacock. new rules on advertising broadband speeds come into force today. nina has more on that and the other main business stories. good morning. yes these are new rules set out by the communications regulator 0fcom. from today when you sign up for a broadband contract you'll get a guaranteed minimum speed. if the company can't deliver it they have a month to fix it — then you can walk away
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from your contract for nothing. about one in five broadband customers complain they're not getting the speed they're promised. the electric car maker owned by elon musk tesla has said will start accepting orders for its model 3 in the us at a price of $35,000 (£26,400) - a promise it made more than two years ago. to make the lower price "financially sustainable" it'll only sell online. they will only sell the product on line to keep prices down. remember the old nokia phone with seemingly endless battery life ? the old nokia phone with seemingly endless battery life? now you can watch two days of film and listen to 100 hours of music before needing to be recharged. it is three times the height of the current smart fine and no word on its weight.
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health leaders are warning there is a danger of a measles outbreak. figures just published show there were almost 1,000 cases of measles in england last year, the highest figure in 5 years. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been looking at the issue. you will? you basically need to use... this centre and this ten—year—old has come in for his jab. there was a measles outbreak at the end of last year and it led to a rush as parents got their children vaccinated. during the measles outbreak the phone was ringing continuously, even on sundays, non—stop, sometimes i would get phone calls up to ten o'clock at night. the who says vaccine coverage should be at least that 5% of the
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population to achieve heard immunity. the number of children under two was 91.2% last year and coverage has been falling. under two was 91.2% last year and coverage has been fallingm under two was 91.2% last year and coverage has been falling. if it keeps going down, we will have a large academic at some point and the risk if that happens every few years you do not have enough systems in place to cover those older children in particular. vaccination is a british invention and a huge success story so why are vaccination rates going down? did a lot of research andi going down? did a lot of research and i made the decision that the risk factors of getting the vaccination our weight the measles outbreak. the anti- fax movement has been putting up false propaganda. in india scare stories are shared on whatsapp. 20 years ago, mmr was
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connected to autism, the doctor was struck off at his ideas still resonate. do you worry what people look up on line? yes because, as an immunisation nurse, i get are so many questions about measles. like is it linked to autism, what other side—effects? it is just putting pa rents side—effects? it is just putting parents might add is and giving them the accurate information. finally getting his injection. some social media sites like pictures and you chip have banned anti— vaccine propaganda. —— youtube. that is enough being done to tackle the false information that is so readily available? we will talk to one family that have
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been really affected by that. time to find out what is happening where you. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. transport for london says its losing one hundred million pounds a year to fare dodgers far more than previously thought. it says new technology including the ability to track where 0yster cards are used has given a clearer picture of how big the problem is. tfl says it's also helping catch more fare evaders with prosecutions up 15% last year. we think it is now even more imperative that we go after those people who deliberately avoid paying a fare and therefore rob londoners of the investment in our transport system. we need to take action against them. a teenager who died
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after he was stabbed in a hairdressers in north london has been named by police as kamali gabbidon—lynck. the 19—year—old was chased by a gang riding bikes in wood green last friday and attacked infront of children. a second man, a 20 year—old, was also injured. detectives are returning to the area tonight to appeal for information. the heads of the met police and london fire brigade willjoin the mayor this morning to review how well the capital's prepared in the event of a no—deal brexit. commissioners cressida dick and dany cotton are among senior officials heading to city hall to discuss the impact it could have on londoners— and how best to communicate the short—term risks. let's take a look at the travel now. we have minor delays on the 0verground between watford junction and euston— not enough trains available apparently. there are currently no trains running beween hertford north and stevenage due to a points failure. a lorry‘s crashed on the m25 (cam) this is how it looks in the area— there are clockwise queues
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from junction 26 for waltham abbey to junction 27 for the m11. in kings cross there's a lane closed for works on euston road at the junction with judd street and there's a burst water main in islington— caledonian road is closed at the junction with killick street. time for the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. today marks the first day of the meteorological spring but it will feel a lot cooler than it did at the beginning of the week. always plenty of cloud around. a few spots of drizzle but other then that it should stay mostly dry. a misty but dry start to the morning. temperatures between seven and nine degrees celsius. we could see a little bit of brightening as we head towards the afternoon. mostly dry but would not rule out a few spots of drizzle at times. 12—13 the top temperature. staying mild for this time of year and just a light south—westerly wind.
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0vernight tonight, we will see some cloud band developing. outbreaks of rain pushing in from the west as we head into saturday morning. a wet start to the day and it will be wet and windy at times over the weekend particularly on sunday. some heavy rain and storm gusts of wind. well i will be back in around half an hour. now though— i'll hand you back tojon and naga. bye bye. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: more than 5,000 online grooming offences were recorded by police in england and wales in the last 18 months. according to new data obtained by the nspcc, instagram, facebook and snapchat were used in 70% of cases of sexual communication with a child. the charity accused social media firms of ten years of failed self—regulation.
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this would be a regulatory model in which platforms have to take concrete action around harms such as grooming, such as child abuse imagery, and manage the platforms do not drive down the number of insta nces not drive down the number of instances of these harms, then they face really tough consequences. for us, that is really significant fines, that is also about a new corporate criminal offence. a damning report has found that problems with the part—privatisation of the probation service in england and wales have cost taxpayers almost £500 million. under the changes, 21 companies were awarded contracts to supervise low— and medium—risk offenders. the national audit office says the government's approach to the reforms meant they were destined to fail.
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the british army has failed dismally at meeting recruitment targets, a group of mps has claimed. the army entered into a £495 million contract with private firm capita to help it meet the target, but the public accounts committee says the resulting online recruitment system was delivered three times over budget and four years too late. around 115,000 pupils across england won't get their first choice of secondary school, due to a continuing shortage of places, according to analysis by the good schools guide. teaching unions warned that more pupils could face disappointment because of what they describe as the intense pressure for places. the schools minister, nick gibb, says an extra 825,000 places have been created since 2010 to keep up with demand. pakistan is due to release an indian fighter pilot who was captured on wednesday after his plane was shot down in kashmir. the country's prime minister has described the move as a gesture of peace, after two weeks of building tension in the region. india has welcomed the decision,
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but says its armed forces remain vigilant. the city of salisbury is expected to be declared fully decontaminated later, almost a year after the nerve agent poisoning of the russian former agent sergei skripal and his daughter. more than 600 military personnel have been involved in the clean—up at 12 sites in the area. watching tv for more than 3.5 hours a day could cause older people to lose their language skills more quickly. researchers at university college london studied 3,500 adults who are over 50 and found that the ability to remember words was twice as bad in those who watched more television. so we tracked 3,500 elder adults over six years, and we found that those who are watching television for under 3.5 hours a day had a decline in their memory
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of about 4—5%, whereas those who were watching it for more than 3.5 hours a day had a decline of around 8—10%. and the more they were watching, the worse their decline was. a painting found in an attic in france could be a long—lost caravaggio worth in excess of £100 million. the work by the italian painter, which depicts a biblical scene, was even left behind by burglars when they raided the home a number of years ago. the painting will be auctioned without reserve later in the year. do you know what? i think those burglars, they are bad people, but didn't have bad taste. you don't like it? no, the painting is being auctioned later in the air. why would you want that in your living room, looking at someone's throat being cut? it is in pretty good nick. i am fascinated by the story behind it, the two women almost
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laughing. i suppose if you lived in a castle it would be all right, i don't know anyone who lives in a castle. you wouldn't find that in my attic, certainly not over the fireplace. it would shock guest, wouldn't it? i have a question for you. what is the shortest amount of time you have held a job before you were fired? well, i wasn't fired, but it was a newspaper, and it didn't fit, they didn't fit me and i didn't fit them. i did two days sorting and picking potatoes, i was rubbish. them. i did two days sorting and picking potatoes, i was rubbishm france, we did picking and we lasted four days, he said we had lasted longer than any brits had before. four days, he said we had lasted longer than any brits had beforelj think many as three months at a newspaper, where i was encouraged,
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basically, you don't really want to stay. because sometimes it doesn't fit and they don't fit you. sometimes it is a marriage made in heaven, like claudio ranieri at leicester, sometimes it is a loveless arranged marriage, and in football, of course, a sport so fickle, you don't get long, do you, to try and turn things around, especially a club like full, in danger of relegation. you don't get encouraged to leave. no, you get called to the boardroom. so claudio ranieri is out, sacked by fulham, with the club second—bottom of the premier league, having conceeded the most goals of any team this season. first team coach scott parker is now in temporary charge. so where has it gone wrong for ranieri, who of course won the premier league with leicester in 2016? well, he was only in charge for 106 days, taking over from slavisa jokanovic in november. it makes him the eighth—shortest permanent manager in premier league history. in that time, he was only able to win three times, losing a total of 11 games in 17 matches. fulham are ten points from safety,
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with only ten games remaining. cardiff city have been accused of abandoning emiliano sala before the footballer died in a plane crash. sala died along with pilot david ibbotson when their plane came down in the english channel in january. former football agent willie mckay booked the flight for sala. he says cardiff left sala to arrange his own travel, an accusation the club strongly reject. he was abandoned in a hotel to more or less to do his travel arrangements himself. nobody in cardiff seemed to be doing anything, and it was a bit embarrassing, in cardiff's situation, because they buy a player
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for 17 million euros, and then leave him in a hotel, himself, trying to to go on the computer and look for a flight. great britain's women won silver in the team pursuit at the track cycling world championships in poland. the team of laura kenny, elinor barker, katie archibald and eleanor dickinson were just beaten by australia in the final, missing out by 0.2 seconds, and it was the four—time 0lympic champion kenny who took the blame for not getting gold. back home, we ran a quicker time, and i had better legs, much better legs. and ijust didn't have it here, these last few days. i don't know why, it's not like i've been feeling unwell or anything. and so yeah, like, ifeel partly responsible for it, to be totally honest, because like i say, back home we went quicker, we ran quicker. so it's a bit disappointing, i guess. there was silver too for the mens's team, who also lost out to an australian team, that broke the world record, on their way to gold in the team pursuit.
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st helens have gone top of super league thanks to a comfortable win over the salford red devils last night. captainjames roby scored two tries, including this one late in the second half. saints have started the season brilliantly, with four wins from four matches so far. the wild child of men's tennis, nick kyrgios, has made a new enemy. rafa nadal says kyrgios lacks respect for the public, his rivals and himself, after being beaten by the australian at the mexican open this week, in a match that kyrgios also served underarm. led to a debate whether underarm is underhand, it is not against the rules, it is not usually very effective. he did that to put his opponent, rafael nadal, off. nadal admittedly does stand a long way behind the baseline. now, what sport do most five— and six—year—olds take up? football, cricket,
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touch rugby maybe? fun and games. but how about doing stunts on motorbikes? proper motorbikes? meet kenny, who is six and rides in one of the uk's remaining motorcycle display teams. they are made up of boys and girls aged 5—16. his tigers team are getting ready for their new tour. and on tomorrow's programme, see what happened when ijoined them in training and had to be part of the show, their wheels centimetres from my stomach. they had to stop me trying to escape. got the whole team had to go over. talk about burying the top line. that is a brilliant picture, that is what we will all tune in for. because it is me being completely terrified by five —year—olds and six —year—olds on motorbikes. don't try it at home. what persuaded you to do that? i have no choice. all the pa rents that? i have no choice. all the parents go along to the training sessions, and they have all had to
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do it at some point. sometimes they jumped three parents, i was lucky i was just jumped three parents, i was lucky i wasjust on my jumped three parents, i was lucky i was just on my own, so jumped three parents, i was lucky i wasjust on my own, so i had more of a chance of not getting a flat stomach. well, next time the three of us can go. you are on the end. no. an iceberg twice the size of new york city looks set to break away from the brunt ice shelf in antarctica. it has led researchers from the british antarctic survey to abandon their research base there because of fears for their safety. it does sound like a movie, doesn't it? tom jordon is from the organisation and joins us now. good morning. so how worrying is this? well, the large iceberg that is about... slightly bigger than greater london, breaking off from
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the brunt ice shelf, it is part of a natural cycle of formation and decay of ice shelves that happens all the time, and we have actually moved our base so it is behind the crack. so although part of the ice shelf from the iceberg is breaking away, the base that we have there on the ice sheu base that we have there on the ice shelf is going to be safe and stable, even want this iceberg has broken away. so it is not like your collea g u es broken away. so it is not like your colleagues are running away, hands in the air, screaming. it is not, because we have known about this crack since about 2016. we have been monitoring it progress and we have a very good network to try and understand how the ice shelf is going to be behaving. we are actually... it was a planned retreat. because you finish your work around about now anyway, don't you? so it was going into the antarctic winter anyway, so what the quys antarctic winter anyway, so what the guys on the ground were actually doing was setting up the base for
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the winter, and we have a prototype turbine down there, so this is going to be providing powerfor all the science, and one of the things about the station is that it is for long—term research, and having this continuous record. so you will be aware, then, because from what i understand it is really hard to just go back to this big chunk of ice thatis go back to this big chunk of ice that is calving away from the bigger lump. there is a split, isn't there, in it. so this split has been extending at a rate of something like 2.5 miles a year or something like 2.5 miles a year or something like that. something like that, so it has been cutting across its 2016, across the ice shelf, and in the next few days, weeks, maybe months, it will go all the way across and this large iceberg will calve off into the ocean. so what is the
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impact of this large chunk separating on sea levels or any land, will float somewhere? so impact on sea levels, this iceberg won't impact on sea levels directly, because ice shelves are already floating so losing an iceberg won't change sea levels directly. what it could do is change how the ice shelf behaves, so ask could flow through theice behaves, so ask could flow through the ice shelf faster, and this is why we are very interested in researching these ice shelves, is because they act as a brake to the ice on the land further inland, and if the brake is released because the ice shelves completely relax, then ice shelves completely relax, then ice can flow into the sea faster, and that really would contribute to sea and that really would contribute to sea level change. and what have you been able to establish sofa about how this is linked to the way in which the world's climate is
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changing? it is very difficult to put any single event like this event down to global warming or climate change, however, across antarctica we are seeing a consistent pattern of glacier retreat in warmer temperatures which does clearly point to climate change. but this specific event appears to be part of a natural cycle. it is fascinating, and we are going to keep across it. and if and when it happens, come back and talk to us. good luck to all of your team is, back and talk to us. good luck to all of yourteam is, of back and talk to us. good luck to all of your team is, of course, who are packing up and going home. it is the first day of spring, and matt is out amongst the flowers at the oxford arboretum this morning. it is also saint davids day. happy saint davids day. we have some peacocks bass some new friends but they still do not want to come down to play at the moment. they are waking upa
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to play at the moment. they are waking up a little bit but you can guarantee it they world cup swooping down once we are on air. we are just on the outskirts of south 0xford at the oxford arboretum. as you are all well aware, yesterday it was the day well aware, yesterday it was the day we reset things back to the more typicalfor this time of we reset things back to the more typical for this time of year. conditions much closer to where we should be. plenty of clouds across the uk. drizzle across eastern areas. a bit of sunshine here and there. some blue skies already in south 0xford here. the cloud at the moment innocuous but the wider strip of
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cloud bringing heavy rain later today and tonight. most places a little drizzle towards the east. quite misty over the hills. sunshine breaking through. weeds reasonably light. temperatures much similar to yesterday just into double light. temperatures much similar to yesterdayjust into double figures for some in scotland. around 10—14 degrees around the uk. temperatures should be 7— nine so we are still doing all right. as you go into the evening, rain into northern ireland. some heavy bursts and that will spread across the rest of the uk. without the cloud and a bit more breeze, temperatures should not drop away too much. frost—free to start saturday. if there is early rain, likely to be in eastern parts of england. all of us will see sunshine
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for a time but northern ireland sees rain return. some parts of east anglia and the south—east could stay dry. with a bit of sunshine highs of 13-14. the dry. with a bit of sunshine highs of 13—14. the proper spring will be with us on sunday. severe gales and further showers in scotland, turning wintry over higher ground. further south, a bit of uncertainty how much rain we will see. the signs are it could be a pretty wet day for england and wales. at around the english channel we could see strong winds. you could almost say typical springlike weather. we certainly have not had any of that recently. how would you like to see brexit
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reported on this programme? we do have to do it. if you've grown any time we mention it, this is your chance to bring your ideas into your coverage. some lucky brexit viewers saveit coverage. some lucky brexit viewers save it to our editorial and which is listened to hear what they wanted. hi. my name is marie, i am married with two children. hi, my name is tony and i voted to remain in the eu. there is so much information. it is easier to switch. i want book for
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summer easier to switch. i want book for summer but if i did not know what is going to happen how can i book?m is making it complicated and confusing. everything about brexit is dourand confusing. everything about brexit is dour and depressing. you are talking about positivity, where is the money coming from? the eu has put some money into this part of the world. if you would pitch one thing to us, what would it be? concentrate on the money given to the eu, concentrate on making this country great. out of this we are going to make some telly. we have been told and we are listening. 0ne we have been told and we are listening. one of the audience members wanted some facts about how we report about travel. you have
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brought simon in. yes, we have the full squad. we get carried away with the beta but it has been brilliant to hit from the audience. it will affect all areas of our life but it can these are confusing. we talk about it every day in and for reporters who report on it every day. one of the audience members you saw in that film sanam. my my first question was, well i and my family need visas to travel through europe? a very good question. the first thing is passport will cease to be valid as an eu document but
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will continue to be valid as a british document until it expires. i need to say that nothing changes in terms of travel to and from the republic of ireland. if the risk a deal nothing changes until the end of 2020. things will change from 2021. if the reason no deal you need to be careful about your passport validity and not just when to be careful about your passport validity and notjust when it expires but when it was issued. in terms of visas, you will need one from 2021. the whole idea is you pay three euros... sorry 7 euros. you do not have to pay if you are over 70s. does that help and answer your visa warriors? it does and it is good to
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have someone explain it in simple terms. are there any other questions? i was planning to do his start but now i am leaving it until some of which i think is wise. i was worried about travel insurance as well, will i still be covered, will it increase? this is all tied in with ehic the card, the insurance ca rd with ehic the card, the insurance card which provides cover for british people travelling abroad to the eu and you get treated as local people. lots of travel insurance say you have to use these if you are going to be in europe. if we leave with no deal, the association of british insurers tells where they will still cover claims even though you can use ehic because it is not there. but if we are going to have a
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deal it will still be valid. in terms of disruption, lots of people worried about these and basically if there are problems in terms of accommodation, you have paper it and the right travel disruptions, you are only covered if your travel insurance covers travel disruption. things could change. are you happy with the terms of your insurance? i will have to read the fine print. we never do. we'll my flights and accommodation is the changing pricewise? it is a good question. it all depends on what happens to the value of the pound relative to not just the euro but also the us dollar thatis just the euro but also the us dollar that is because so much in terms of aviation is priced in dollars. nobody knows but if the pound is low your holiday costs will increase but
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if you are locked into a package holiday, generally they book in advance so you will not be asked for advance so you will not be asked for a surcharge. long—term, fares may go up a surcharge. long—term, fares may go up and choice decrease but it will depend on how we leave. it is audience takeover today and lots of people on social media worried about their drivers license. if there is no deal you will need notjust an international driving permit, £5 50 is. you might need more than one because of course spain is covered by the 1949 agreement along with cyprus and malta every other country is covered under the 19 68th agreed on. at 1926 if you are going to lichtenstein but it is very small and easy to avoid. i have flat. i do
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not have to worry about that. i am keeping myjob very simple this morning. your stories will continue through the day. keep your questions coming in. isn't it really in to hear more from the audience. perfect. debs has replied, how do i wa nt perfect. debs has replied, how do i want brexit reported? as little as possible. sorry, i cannot promise that this month. not the month to watch the news in that case. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. transport for london says its losing one hundred million pounds a year to fare dodgers— far more than previously thought. it says new technology, including the ability to track where 0yster cards are used, has given a clearer picture of how big the problem is. tfl says it's also helping catch more fare evaders,
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with prosecutions up 15 per cent last year. we think it is now even more imperative that we go after those people who deliberately avoid paying a fair and therefore rob people londononers of the investment in our transport system. we need to take action against them. a teenager who died after he was stabbed in a hairdressers in north london, has been named by police as kamali gabbidon—lynck. the 19—year—old was chased by a gang riding bikes in wood green last friday and attacked infront of children. a second man, a 20 year—old, was also injured. detectives are returning to the area tonight to appeal for information. the heads of the met police and london fire brigade willjoin a legal challenge against the mayor
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against a consumption charge. the measure is part of the plan to tackle air pollution but the group says it discriminates against them as they are mostly from lack, asian and other minority. let's take a look at the travel now... we have minor delays on the 0verground— between watford junction and euston— not enough trains available apparently. buses are replacing great northern trains between hertford north and stevenage due to a points failure. a lorry‘s crashed on the m25 (cam) this is how it looks in the area— it's been slow from junction 26 for waltham abbey to junction 27 for the m11. expect delays too in bloomsbury and holborn southampton row is closed for works. and there's a burst water main in islington caledonian road is closed at the junction with killick street. time for the weather now with elizabeth rizzini good morning. today marks the first day of the meteorological spring but it will feel a lot cooler than it did
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at the beginning of the week. always plenty of cloud around. a few spots of drizzle but other then that it should stay mostly dry. a misty but dry start to the morning. temperatures between seven and nine degrees celsius. we could see a little bit of brightening as we head towards the afternoon. mostly dry but would not rule out a few spots of drizzle at times. 12—13 the top temperature. staying mild for this time of year and just a light south—westerly wind. 0vernight tonight, we will see some cloud band developing. outbreaks of rain pushing in from the west as we head into saturday morning. a wet start to the day and it will be wet and windy at times over the weekend particularly on sunday. some heavy rain and storm gusts of wind. well i will be back in around half an hour, there's more news, travel and weather of course.
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good morning welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. good morning, everyone. 0ur headlines today. social media firms are told to do more to tackle child grooming after 5,000 online offences were recorded in 18—months. there's a danger of a large measles epidemic as vaccination rates decline. public health england claims there were around 1,000 cases in england last year. pakistan is set to release the captured indian pilot as a "peace gesture" later this morning after shooting down his plane in kashmir. good morning. getting the internet speed you need. new broadband regulations come in today to protect users' rights. but are they tough enough? good morning. a last roll of the dice for fulham. they sacked their manager, claudio ranieri, after only 106 days in charge, with relegation
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from the premier league looking looking ever more likely. a fairly cloudy but largely derived start to the first day of meteorological spring. temperatures where they should be for the time of year, even if not as warm as they have been. be prepared for windy and at times wet weather this weekend. i have the details right here on brea kfast. very good morning to you, it is friday the 1st of march. our top story: more than 5,000 online grooming offences were recorded by police in england and wales in the last 18 months. according to new data obtained by the nspcc, instagram, facebook and snapchat were used in 70% of cases of sexual communication with a child. the charity accused social media firms of "ten years of failed self—regulation". ben ando reports. the nspcc describes it as the wild west web, and it's children who are falling prey to online outlaws and being groomed. most are in their teens, but many are younger — one just five—years—old. of the big social media apps,
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it's instagram that's seen the biggest increase in abusers targeting children. but snapchat and facebook are also widely used, and between them, these three platforms account for 70% of reported cases of sexual communications being made with children. the figures were obtained by the nspcc and freedom of information requests to police forces in england and wales. the charity found that between april and september 2017, paedophiles attempting to groom or coerce children into sex used instagram on 126 occasions. but in the same period last year, that figure had gone up threefold, to 428, and while girls aged 12—15 are the most common targets, one in five victims was aged 11 or under. in a statement, facebook said...
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but the nspcc says this is the result of ten years of failed self—regulation. it wants the rules tightened. if the platforms do not drive down the number of instances of these harms, then they face really tough consequences. for us, that is really significant fines, that is also about a new corporate criminal offence. the government says it is listening, and a forthcoming white paper will clearly set out what responsibilities social media companies have, and the consequences of shirking them. ben ando, bbc news. a report has found that problems with part privatisation of the probation service in england and wales have cost taxpayers almost £500 million more than anticipated.
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at the time, 21 companies were awarded contracts to supervise low and medium—risk offenders. the national audit office says the government's approach to the reforms meant they were destined to fail. the changes were brought in by chris grayling, when he wasjustice secretary. here's our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. they were his flagship reforms when he wasjustice secretary. in 2015, chris grayling split probation between private companies and the national service. and a national service. he called the process transforming rehabilitation. the aim — to cut reoffending and reduce the cost of crime to society. but the companies' contracts are being terminated months early, and independent experts now say the system was never going to work. 0ur report concludes that the ministry ofjustice set itself up to fail in how it approached these probation reforms, and that the consequences of that is services have suffered as a result, and the decision to end the contracts early will come at additional cost to the taxpayer. the review of transforming
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rehabilitation raises serious questions about ministry ofjustice decision—making. it says the payment—by—results model it used was not well suited to probation. reoffending targets were missed, and taxpayers will have to pay at least £467 million more than under the original terms of the probation contracts. as part of the reforms, probation supervision was extended to prisoners who had served short sentences. as a result, the national audit office says the number sent back to jail for breaching their release conditions has skyrocketed. the ministry ofjustice accepted the performance of the private probation companies was too often deeply disappointing, but the department said it was spending less than initially forecast. it's been almost a decade after his death, two men have accused pop star michaeljackson of sexually abusing them hundreds of times
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in the late 80s and early 905. wade robson and james safechuck say that from the age of seven and ten they were abused by the late singer at his neverland ranch in california. michaeljackson's family denies the claims. 0ur correspondent dan johnson reports from los angeles. i was seven years old. michael asked, "do you and the family want to come to neverland?" once again, the king of pop faces allegations he groomed and molested young boys. michael sexually abused me from the age of seven years old until 14 years old. hello, wade. today is your birthday. when the star appeared in court 14 years ago, wade testified that he had never been harmed. i love you, goodbye. this otherworldly figure, this god to me, who had now become my best friend — no way was i ever going to do anything that would pull me away from him. mrjackson? james safechuck was in a commercial with jackson. he says he was abused
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from the age of ten. you know, he grooms the children, and he grooms the parents, as well. so, you know, it's a meticulous sort of build—up. michaeljackson's music is still loved, and generates millions of pounds every year. he himself always maintained that he had never hurt any child, and some of his family members have continued to defend his reputation. this documentary is not telling the truth. there has not been — not one piece of evidence that corroborates their story. almost a decade after his death, michaeljackson's character remains under the spotlight. his true legacy is still being questioned. danjohnson, bbc news, los angeles. still something that fascinates many people. there'll be more on this story on the victoria derbyshire programme from 10am on the bbc news channel. the british army has "failed dismally" at meeting
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recruitment targets, a group of mps has claimed. the army entered into a £495 million contract with private firm capita to help it meet the target, but the public accounts committee says today the resulting online recruitment system was delivered three times over budget and four years too late. an indian fighter pilot captured by pakistan on wednesday after it shot down his plane in kashmir is set to be released today. the country's prime minister imran khan has described the move as a "gesture of peace". india has welcomed the decision but says its armed forces remain vigilant. 0ur correspondent sangita myska is in delhi this morning. good to see you. it is so interesting what can happen in the terms of politics and diplomacy over the period of 24 hours. it is very much hoped that this handover will go ahead as the pakistanis have
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promised at around 2pm this afternoon at a checkpoint on the border between india and pakistan. if that happens it could mark the beginning of the de—escalation of tensions between the two regional powers that has been going on for about two weeks. pakistan confirms it will happen today, the indian side still saying they don't have confirmation of that. nevertheless, let me recap how this indian pilot ended up in pakistan's possession. there was a dogfight in the air between the two micro air forces over the disputed region of kashmir. kashmir lies between the indian and the pakistani border is, and it has been disputed for 70 years who should have control of it. this latest round of tension has been escalating ever since there was an attack by islamist militants based in pakistan on indian troops. during
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that attack, 40 indian troops were killed. the international community over the past couple of weeks has become extremely concerned. why? because both india and pakistan have nuclear warheads. at the moment, both countries are spinning this handover as a victory for themselves. sangita myska, thank you for taking us through that. health chiefs are warning there is a danger of a large measles epidemic as vaccination rates decline. public health england claims there were around 1,000 cases in england last year — the highest figure in five years. in a moment, we ll talk to a mother whose daughter wasn't immunised, leaving her with a life—limiting condition. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been looking at the issue. hi, yitzchok, how are you? are you well? so, basically, he just needs his mmr. the lu bavitch centre and ten—year—old yitzchok has come in for his jabs.
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there was a measles outbreak in this part of north london at the end of last year. it led to a rush, as parents got their children vaccinated. during the measles outbreak, you know, the phone wasjust ringing continuously. even on sundays — nonstop. sometimes, i would get phone calls up to ten o'clock at night. the world health organisation says vaccine coverage should be at least 95% of the population to achieve what's called herd immunity. in england last year, the number of children under two who'd had the mmrjab was 91.2%, and coverage has been falling for the last four years. if it keeps going down, we're going to have a large epidemic at some point and, you know, the risk of that happens every few years, if you don't have enough systems in place to mop up those older children, in particular. vaccination is a british invention and a huge medical success story, so why are immunisation rates going down?
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i did a lot of research and ultimately made the decision that the risk factors of getting the vaccination outweighed the risk factor of a measles outbreak. in parts of america, the so—called anti—vax movement has been putting up false propaganda on social media sites. in india, scare stories are shared on whatsapp. it is now more than 20 years since andrew wakefield falsely connected mmr with autism. he was struck off for dishonest research, but his ideas still resonate. do you worry about what people are looking up, online? yeah, yes, because, you know, as an immunisation nurse, i get asked to so many questions about measles. is it linked to autism? what are the side effects? so, you know, it's... ..it‘sjust putting parents' minds at ease and giving them the accurate information. yitzchok is finally getting his injection.
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just relax for me, darling. there you go. some social media sites, like pinterest and youtube, have already banned anti—vaccination propaganda. yesterday, facebook said it would make the posts less prominent, but is enough being done to tackle the false information that is so readily available? graham satchell reporting. let's continue and talk about the subject. joining us now is estephanie dunn from the royal college of nursing. and from west yorkshire, jo walton — whose daughter wasn't immunised as a child. i know there is a bit of a delay on the line, but if you could just explain what happened in your case. you are kind of living with the consequences now. is you are kind of living with the consequences now. is that right? we are indeed. good morning, everybody.
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this is sarah, this is my daughter. sarah has a condition called sspe, which is thankfully a rare but devastating complication of the measles virus and measles infection. sarah had measles when she was 11 months old. she was too young to be vaccinated at the time but was attending a nursery where a number of children were circulating the infection. she wasn't particularly poorly at the time. she was covered in spots but she was quite a happy child and it didn't really make her very grisly or uncomfortable and she recovered really well afterwards and had a very normal and happy childhood and young adult hood. but
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at the age of 25 whilst in london studying for a midwifery diploma she became ill again, and after many months they managed to pin down the fa ct months they managed to pin down the fact that she had this very rare complication which was a recurrence of the infection that she had when she was 11 months old. so that was all those years later it came back ain? all those years later it came back again? how does that affect her life and your life today? well, sarah was and your life today? well, sarah was a very happy, healthy, interested, engaged young woman. she did very well at school. she has a degree from st andrews in cellular molecular biology and she decided
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she was going to go into public service as a midwife, and went off to study in london. she had boundless energy, and she would have been a force for good in the world because whatever she turned her hand to she threw herself in with great gusto. and now her life has been com pletely gusto. and now her life has been completely ta ken away gusto. and now her life has been completely taken away from her by the measles virus. her life is devastated. she has no movement, no ability to communicate verbally, and she has to put up with me looking after her all the time, so i get to make all the decisions, she doesn't get to make any of her own, really. and obviously, in addition to the devastation to sarah, it completely devastates the rest of the family as well. so all of her family and friends are coping with the fact that she is no longer able to be pa rt that she is no longer able to be part of their lives in the way that
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she was before. measles is evil. it robs people of their future. it ta kes robs people of their future. it takes away their lives. vaccination is the only way to avoid somebody from developing this type of complication at some stage in the future. jo, hold on a moment. i don't think anybody watching will fail to be shocked, touched by what jo and sarah are going through now. and asjo said, she thought when sarah had measles at 11 months old, she couldn't have measles, she was too young to be vaccinated. at the moment you have it when you are about a year old. what are the issues you see when it comes to vaccinations and take up? as a
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pa re nt vaccinations and take up? as a parent they are caught with the dilemma because there is so much conflict information out there in the media. that drives a mistrust of what professionals are probably trying to tell them. i think as health care professionals, as nurses involved who are talking to families about vaccination, we understand where they find themselves. i would really urge them to talk to their noses and general practice, or talked of a health visitor, or a school nurse, to get a sense of what the real evidence is because if you just believe what you read in the media you would be polarised and not be able to make a decision. 20 years ago there was the big scare and those headlines in the media. i think these days, certainly here we are conscious about giving the right information. when you say the media, do you mean social media? there is quite a lot on the internet and we have seen what some of the social media outlets are trying to do to
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control those messages. but the impact of what happened 20 years ago has left us with a cohort of young people who are 15—18 now who are not immunised against measles because their parents were affected by what was going around at the time. many of those 15—18 —year—olds, the majority of those are fine, so many will think, hold on, i'm 0k majority of those are fine, so many will think, hold on, i'm ok here. and also, there have been cases, have there not, where the vaccination, and i'm playing devil's advocate, vaccinations have been linked to complications, and a negative impact on life after vaccinations and that's what parents here. but that's incredibly rare, if you think before we introduced the vaccine... is it more rare than what we are seeing that has happened with sarah? yes, i think it is, we are seeing that has happened with sarah? yes, ithink it is, because before we introduced the vaccine around 100 people died measles every year, so it is not, as sarah's mum jo said, it is not a mild childhood
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illness, it has the potential to ta ke illness, it has the potential to take life and to leave you disabled, whether it be blind, deaf, or totally debilitated. those people who are well at the moment, if they we re who are well at the moment, if they were in the presence of, or in the middle of an epidemic, as we have seen middle of an epidemic, as we have seenin middle of an epidemic, as we have seen in recent years that they could contract measles and not be aware that they are susceptible. just going back tojo and give her the last word on this. we have heard about your experience with sarah. when you hear this story we are mentioning today, 1000 cases in england of measles over the last year, warnings about a potential epidemic if we don't get more vaccinations, does that make you think, and what is your message to people watching? 0ne people watching? one of the things that sarah actually said to me after we discovered what her illness was, was that it was a totally unnecessary illness and she didn't want anybody else to go through what she was going to go through. it is
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unnecessary. measles is unnecessary. children do not need to suffer from it. they don't need to suffer from the side effects from it. but the only way to do that is to vaccinate it, vaccinate against it. we have the ability to vaccinate it off the planet, as we did with smallpox. and we ought really to be taking that opportunity and removing this risk from the lives of our children. none of us live in a bubble. we all interact with other people and the choices that we make for us and our own children impact upon the lives, not only over us and our own children, but also of the other children, but also of the other children and vulnerable people that those children come into contact with. it is really important to vaccinate because you may not suffer, your child may not suffer,
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but somebody else's child may suffer because of the choice that you've made. jo, a very clear message from you. thank you to you and to sarah and we wish you well. thank you for joining us. i could see you nodding in total agreement as well. thank you very much. it is 8:22am. matt is in 0xford skipping amongst the daffodils on saint david's day. good morning, happy saint david's day to you, first day meteorological in speaking of spring, the snowdrops and daffodils giving that away. let's look at the forecast, you might need to get your sunshine yellow from the daffodils this morning because there is plenty of cloud, and a bit of brightness breaking through every now and again. for the vast majority it is dry to start the beginning of march. a bit of dampness in the air admittedly but the main rain bearing clouds is out to the west of ireland, that strip of white cloud
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you can see nudging in from the atla ntic you can see nudging in from the atlantic bringing heavier rain towards northern ireland by the end of the afternoon and into the evening in particular. 0ut there this morning, there may bejust about some drizzle squeezed from the cloud across parts of eastern scotla nd cloud across parts of eastern scotland and eastern parts of england especially. but as i said, there is some sunshine here and there, the best of which in the pub as far south west, south wales, south—east scotland and the far north—east of england as well. the cloud will be thinning here and there, most staying dry with light winds but the breeze will pick up towards the west and northern ireland later, as the rain gets closer. temperature is nowhere near as high as they have been lately but they are where they should be this time of year, if not still a little above, ranging from nine in parts of scotla nd above, ranging from nine in parts of scotland down to 13—14 in the south—east corner. this evening rain arrives in northern ireland, heavy rain to end the day, the rain will turn a showery heading across into parts of scotland, wales and west in england. eventually the east of england. eventually the east of england later in the night. all
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helping to keep the temperatures from dropping too much, first restart tomorrow, like this morning. could be damp first thing across eastern parts of england but in fairness eastern england will have the driest weather throughout the day on saturday because quite quickly during the morning it turns wet and windy across northern ireland yet again, that rain spreading again into scotland, wales, western england going into the afternoon, sunshine at best across parts of the south—east corner during the second half of the day. we will all see some sunshine on saturday, temperatures up to 15 degrees in the south—east corner, most degrees in the south—east corner, m ost pla ces degrees in the south—east corner, most places similar to what we see today, tempered by the strength of the wind. which will pick up across the wind. which will pick up across the north of scotland on saturday night into sunday morning, severe gales possible, frequent showers through sunday as well, turning wintry over the higher ground, testimony that it is getting that little cooler, towards other parts of england and wales on sunday it will be cloudy with outbreaks of rain. that is how it is looking. back to naga and john.
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how did you greet us? good morning, in welsh. why don't you do that to the peacocks and they will come flying down to you in a high squeaky voice? i've fallen out with the peacocks, they don't want to play. he has short patience, a short fuse format. it is 8:25am. if you are looking at your phone and your wi—fi is buffering and you are struggling with the internet you might be tempted to get another deal and a faster broadband speed. should you indeed? sometimes you are tempted to throw your device out of the window, aren't you? one in five people struggle with the broadband speed they have and it is common. today new regulations from 0fcom the regulator so that when you sign up to your deal it should be explicitly clear what the speed of your broadband is. that means how quickly
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you can download films, listen to music, and if you are not getting that speed, you have a month to go back to your provider and say i need this be as soon as possible and if they do not rectified in a few weeks you can tearup they do not rectified in a few weeks you can tear up your contract and shop around for a better deal free of charge. the idea is you are more in control if something goes wrong and you do not get the service you have been told. sounds fabulous. it sounds fabulous but it has been criticised this morning because it is not compulsory. so, providers will be signing up to this on a volu nta ry will be signing up to this on a voluntary basis but if they don't rectify it, if they don't meet the new criteria, there is no legal repercussions for them, so it might not work. another problem, the onus is on you, the customer, to call it out, it is not on 0fcom and the provider so that's not great, a lot of time and effort to make complaints. and if you are already ina complaints. and if you are already in a contract it is not necessarily valid, but the advice as ever is to shop around, there are loads of deals and as soon as you find your new deal, make sure you know exactly how quick your broadband could be.
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you have a one—month window to get out of the contract. and to check it is living up the promise? 0fcom promised these regulations will work but our audience will let us will work but our audience will let us know. i was looking at your tablet, you we re i was looking at your tablet, you were talking about getting frustrated and throwing it out of the window. yours is all smashed. it has been a heavy brexit month, sometimes my temper gets the better of me. i'm scared of that tempo, i'm moving this way. thanks, nina, you were brilliant, really interesting. 0nly brilliant, really interesting. only a month to go! time for the news, travel and weather where you are. hgppy happy st david's day, the first day of meteorological spring. the weather may be a little cloudy, a little cooler than recently but about average for the time of year. we will see a bit of brightness developing later on this afternoon, particularly across south—west england and across wales. the mr
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murk of this well left and clear away. could be the odd shower across eastern areas of england but for the most part, dry. we keep a lot of that cloud at maximum temperature is getting up to 10—13dc. later on this afternoon, we start to see some rain moving into northern ireland, that will turn heavy. gradually it will spread its way across the rcn into western into western scotland, western into western scotland, western parts of england and wales before moving further eastward. temperatures not falling much below 5-8d. it temperatures not falling much below 5—8d. it means we start off their weekend on a rather soggy note. the wind increasing throughout the day on saturday and into sunday as well and we continue to see a bit of rain. quite wet and windy at times. rain will clear first thing saturday morning. some early morning brightness before the cloud gathers in the west, and with that some heavy rain moving through. it won't reach the far east of england so much of the day it will stay dry and fairly pleasant. temperature 13—14
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but for all of us the wind will pick up. it is courtesy of this area of low pressure. as we go into sunday, we dragged this weather front across the far south of the uk. there is some uncertainty as to how far north this area of rain will be fostered at the moment, we think it's most likely to be across wales, the midlands, eastern england and the south of england. further north, some brighter skies, feather showers into scotland. the winds will ease out on sunday compared to brisk conditions on saturday first at maximum temperatures getting to 9-13. that maximum temperatures getting to 9—13. that is all from me, bye—bye.
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